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Auto insurance quotes – difference in states

Auto insurance can sometimes be a beast that is hard to understand. So is the situation with auto insurance requirements and legislation across different states. There's no real federal-level legal framework regarding auto insurance. Instead there are state-level requirements that vary once your cross the state border and can even contradict in two neighboring states. So how do you deal with all these contradictions and how to avoid falling into the trap of having insufficient auto insurance coverage in your state? Well, it's not that complicated.

All states require an auto insurance policy to carry only third party liability coverage, which includes bodily injury and property damage. All other coverage types are purely optional no matter where you're buying the policy. Now, what's really important to know is that all states have different minimum limits on the amount of third party liability insurance to be carried for the policy to be valid. Here are the numbers:

1. Alaska 50/100/25
2. Alabama 20/40/10
3. Arkansas 25/50/15
4. Arizona 15/30/10
5. California 15/30/5
6. Colorado 25/50/15
7. Connecticut 20/40/10
8. Delaware 15/30/5
9. Florida 10/20/10
10. Georgia 15/30/10
11. Hawaii 20/40/10
12. Idaho 20/50/15
13. Illinois 20/40/15
14. Indiana 25/50/10
15. Iowa 20/40/15
16. Kansas 25/50/10
17. Kentucky 25/50/10
18. Louisiana 10/20/10
19. Maine 50/100/25
20. Maryland 20/40/10
21. Massachusetts 20/40/5
22. Michigan 20/40/10
23. Minnesota 30/60/10
24. Mississippi 25/50/25
25. Missouri 25/50/10
26. Montana 25/50/10
27. Nebraska 25/50/25
28. New Hampshire 25/50/25
29. New Jersey 15/30/5
30. New Mexico 25/50/10
31. Nevada 15/30/10
32. New York 25/50/10
33. North Carolina 30/60/25
34. North Dakota 25/50/25
35. Ohio 12.5/25/7.5
36. Oklahoma 10/20/10
37. Oregon 25/50/10
38. Pennsylvania 15/30/5
39. Rhode Island 25/50/25
40. South Carolina 25/50/25
41. South Dakota 25/50/25
42. Tennessee 25/50/10
43. Texas 30/60/25
44. Utah 25/65/15
45. Virginia 25/50/20
46. Vermont 25/50/10
47. Washington 25/50/10
48. Wisconsin 25/50/10
49. West Virginia 20/40/10
50. Wyoming 25/50/20

The numbers next to the state name come in thousands of dollars and represent the minimum amount of third party liability to be included to the policy. The first two numbers represent the bodily injury liability limits, the first referring to per-person coverage and the second – per-accident. The third number refers to property damage liability coverage per accident. For example, if you're a driver on New Mexico, your policy should have at least $25,000/$50,000 of bodily injury and $10,000 of property damage liability coverage in order to be valid. However, it is highly recommended to purchase more coverage as these limits usually suit only minor to moderate accidents and aren't sufficient for paying off serious collisions. And you definitely don't want to end up paying the difference out of own pocket since the costs can be overwhelming.